Three Steps To Home Inspection Zen

Three Steps To Home Inspection Zen

For many prospective home sellers, going through the process of a home inspection can be a painful process that entails letting a stranger into the home to judge every nook and cranny. As the biggest and most prized possession of most consumers, having the home inspected in this way is a bit like having the inner sanctum of your life on display. Inspections certainly do not have to be like this.

By maintaining an even perspective and keeping in mind three core tenets, you can keep your home inspection process easy and calm. As with most business transactions, getting yourself to view the transaction as someone from the outside might can be difficult, but will ultimately take a lot of the stress out of the situation.

Keep Your Feelings Grounded In Reality
Everyone wants to think that they have the best home on the block, a spotless testament to a diligent work ethic and family prosperity. As homes age, the reality is that they will develop problems here and there that a home inspector is trained to uncover. These problems are certainly not your fault as time has all it needs to damage a foundation or roof all on its own.

No matter how great a condition your home is in, the very nature of a home inspection is to uncover issues that a prospective buyer might have a problem with, so prepare for that eventuality. These problems are no reflection on your care of the home but more its initial construction and degradation over time, two things you have nothing to do with. This is just another step in a real estate transaction and preparing for a few issues here and there will greatly reduce your stress.

Emotions Are Great, Just Not For Inspections
After living in a particular piece of real estate for a long time, there will always be memories and emotions tied to that property. As a seller, you have chosen to move on from those emotions and memories, committing to create new memories in a new property. Keep this in mind as a home inspector goes through your home and comes back with problems or issues.

You might have done a lot of work on a furnace, for example, and remember fondly the day that you got it working again in top shape. If an inspector comes back after looking at the furnace and declares that you need a new one to pass inspection, don’t let anger be your first response. No matter what energy and time you’ve put in to a home, there will always be factors outside of your control, like aging issues and local regulations, which dictate an inspector’s actions.

Put Yourself In A Buyer’s Shoes
Above all, imagine that you are stepping into your home for the first time, looking at it with a critical eye to determine whether you’d want to live there and what you’d fix if you did. This is the kind of mentality a buyer is bringing to your real estate transaction and the inspector will help them bring to light just the kind of property they are purchasing.

Don’t begrudge a buyer of this step as you are going to go through it on your new home purchase and wouldn’t have it any other way. Each point brought up on the inspection is a point brought up to protect the buyer and provide as much information as possible, two things you would love to benefit from on your own home purchase.

Having your home picked apart by a home inspector will most likely never be a heart-warming experience, but taking these three tenets to heart will help you get through the situation with class. Real estate transactions represent an important transition period and getting through a simple and easy inspection will only easy that transition for both you and your prospective real estate buyer.

This is another original article by Joe Lane, co-owner of The Lane Real Estate Team at http://www.joelane.com/. Are you looking for an experienced Tri City WA Real Estate agency? With 20 years of service based, business experience, Joe and Colleen Lane work hard to serve home buyers and sellers for the Tri Cities of Washington’s Kennewick, Richland, Pasco, and surrounding areas.

Do the Fixer Upper Math

Do The Fixer-Upper Math

Renovating homes has gotten a boat load of publicity over the past few years as a great way for prospective real estate investors to make great money over a short period of time. Hopefully, you’ve taken that message with a grain of salt as renovations can often take a lengthy period of time and selling the home for a big profit is never a guarantee.

In fact, as any real estate investor will tell you, a few quick calculations will give you at least a rough idea of your chances for profit, be it large or small. Doing these quick and dirty calculations will not only give you that forecast of the future but determine whether a particular investment is worth the hassle, a step that many real estate investors skip that deserves adequate attention.

Target Your End Value
You can never, ever use the amount of money you put into a particular piece of real estate as the basis for a price increase. If you bought the home for $100,000 and did $20,000 worth of work to it, you are never guaranteed to get $120,000 out of it. The real estate market simply does not work that way and recognizing that is the first step towards pegging down an accurate end sale price for your profit calculations.

An appraiser is your best resource at pegging an end sale value as the appraiser will be able to tell you the kind of value you will add to a property with a given renovation. If you are going to add a certain amount of square footage or a finished basement or any other improvement, take what the home will look like after you are done and compare it against other similar homes that have recently sold in the area.

That is the only way to determine the kind of value you might receive and an appraiser will keep you grounded in reality when your head starts swelling with the prospect of potential profit.

The Big Minus
Of course, those renovations cost money and you will have to calculate every piece of dry wall, every nail and every hour of labor that you think will be necessary to get a home to the level you need it to be at. After those costs, you have to factor in transaction costs like your realtor’s fee, closing costs, potential property taxes over the course of your ownership and loan fees that some real estate investors neglect to think about.

Your expenses are not limited to the amount of money you put into renovations, giving you much more to think about than lumber and nails when you are calculating potential profit. This can be a complicated process and getting expert help from someone that has been through the process once or twice before will be invaluable towards projecting potential profit.

Is It Worth It?
This is the big question that some real estate investors forget to ask themselves as they pursue a potential investment. If your profit window is extremely tight and your potential profit may be $10,000, perhaps that investment is not worth the hassle of renovating the home, putting it on the market and finding a new buyer. You have to decide for yourself what your time is worth but just because there is profit to be had does not mean that your time is best spent on that project. Everyone’s threshold is different so determine yours and you will go a long way towards picking out projects that you will ultimately be successful with and enjoy.

These simple steps can save real estate investors from getting involved with properties that they are simply not ready for. Think about all of the costs before ever getting involved with an investment and learn to value your time. Doing the math is one thing, but using it to make an informed decision is what separates the real estate investors that fail and those that ultimately thrive.

This is another original article by Joe Lane, co-owner of The Lane Real Estate Team at http://www.joelane.com/. Are you looking for an experienced Tri City WA Real Estate agency? With 20 years of service based, business experience, Joe and Colleen Lane work hard to serve home buyers and sellers for the Tri Cities of Washington’s Kennewick, Richland, Pasco, and surrounding areas.

Student Loans & Mortgages: Owning Real Estate In Your 20s

No more than ever before, people in their 20s are looking into owning real estate. As mortgage payments have increasingly been the domain of younger and younger people, questions have arisen over the true benefit of owning a home at a young age and just what type of person should do so. Certainly, owning real estate at a young age is not for everyone and there are some things to keep in mind when considering the possibility.

Of course, one of the key benefits of being a young person is given up when committing to a mortgage, an element of freedom. It is difficult to pick up and move when a mortgage payment is due every month and that can weigh heavily on a decision to plant roots at any age. Add to that an uncertainty in income as a result of being fairly new to the workforce and it can be easy to see why up until recently, the idea of buying a home was foreign to most 20 year-olds.

Increasingly, the benefits of building equity in a home are speaking to young people, making the prospect of real estate ownership more attractive. While building equity is certainly a big benefit to planting roots with a particular piece of real estate, young people need to understand that those benefits are not instant and that a long-term commitment is necessary to reap any rewards.

Because of the propensity of young people to be in flux whether it be in job, location or relationship status, planting those roots can be difficult. For benefits to truly be seen through a build up in equity, payments have to made for a lengthy period of time on a mortgage. As many initial mortgage payments go towards the interest on a loan rather than the actual loan amount, they do little to build equity in a piece of real estate.

That piece of information can sometimes be missed by young people that simply want to build equity and aren’t sure how to go about doing it or just what it takes. Giving up freedom is a steep price to be paid and the benefits are not immediate.

An additional wrinkle that some young people are adding is early investment desires and the attractiveness of pulling a rental payment on a leased property. Becoming a landlord is no small decision and the burden of having to deal with individual renters and the upkeep that rental properties demand can be a daunting one.

Interestingly enough, that burden has been increasingly taken on by young people, perhaps suggesting a better dissemination of information about real estate investment opportunities and the gradual death of the stigma that being a landlord is only for the old or rich.

In the end, if you are a young person and have considered the prospect of getting involved in real estate investment or ownership, significant discussion has to take place with yourself over your goals in life and the value of flexibility to accomplish those goals. There are lucky people out there who land the perfect job early in life and for those people, perhaps they can be sure that they intend to stay in a certain area for a very long time. For those people, a mortgage makes sense and building up early equity can certainly pay off later.

For those that have a more muddied version of the future and would love the ability to be able to take that new job opportunity at a moment’s notice, perhaps early home ownership is not the way to go. The struggle between freedom and future fortune can seem like a difficult one, but by evaluating your personal goals, you can decide on whether home ownership is in your future.

This is another original article by Joe Lane, co-owner of The Lane Real Estate Team at http://www.joelane.com/. Are you looking for an experienced Tri City WA Real Estate agency? With 20 years of service based, business experience, Joe and Colleen Lane work hard to serve home buyers and sellers for the Tri Cities of Washington’s Kennewick, Richland, Pasco, and surrounding areas.

Five reasons why buying a home is still a good idea


(ARA) – A still murky economy and uncertain real estate market may have you wondering if buying a home is a good idea. Whether you’re thinking about buying, or already have and just need some affirmation, you may find it comforting to know there are still plenty of good reasons for financially stable people to buy a house. Here are a few:

* Homeownership can help make good credit even better. If your credit is in poor shape, you’ll want to monitor it before seeking a mortgage. But if you have good credit, live within your means, and consistently make good financial decisions, a mortgage can be the kind of “good debt” that helps your overall financial health. Making regular payments on a mortgage shows potential lenders that you’re a less risky candidate for a home loan. Before you begin home shopping, it’s a good idea to check your credit. Enrolling in a product like freecreditscore.com can help you better understand and leverage your credit.

* A mortgage can function like an automatic savings plan. By now, you’ve read the news reports about how little we Americans save these days. Well, every year you pay on your fixed-rate mortgage, is a year of building equity, and equity is like money in the bank. When it’s time to sell – whether you’ve stayed in your home seven years or the full 30 year term – you’ll have created equity and should be able to sell your house for more than you owe.

* Homeownership comes with plenty of financial perks, including an income tax credit for property taxes you pay on your home. For detailed information on tax breaks check out IRS.gov. Buying a home also affords you the opportunity to halt your housing costs. Rent will always go up from year to year, but if you have a fixed-rate mortgage (avoid adjustable rates) your biggest annual expense – housing costs – will be locked-in.

* Mortgage interest is a good deal when stacked up against other types of interest that don’t do much for you – such as high credit card interest rates or low rates on savings accounts and CDs. Mortgage rates are low right now, meaning you can pay less over the life of a loan than at practically any other time in recent history. Plus, it’s the only kind of interest that you can deduct from your taxes.

* Prices are still relatively low and inventory is high. It’s been a buyer’s market for a long time, but that’s going to change. The question is: when will the market start to improve in your area, taking home prices with it? You’ll have to do some legwork and astute research to determine when is the best time for you to buy.

If you monitor your credit and are on a sound financial footing, buying a home can still be a good idea. And now is as good a time as any to make your purchase.

Upgrading to the house of your dreams


(ARA) – The real estate market is still in a state of limbo, which has many homeowners staying in place and looking for ways to make their current abode the most comfortable it can be. Real estate agents expect the market to continue to be flat in 2012, according to ActiveRain Corp, a real estate social network. Because they’re not selling, homeowners are looking at remodeling rooms, changing out decorating schemes and in some cases, even adding on to the home.

Incorporating a new look into the home – whether it’s in the kitchen, bedroom or bathroom – can really change the feel of the house. Upgrading a bathroom is a great place to start, because it’s a smaller room and is used by both occupants and guests.  A remodel can also help you save money on your utility bills. With a new bathroom adding a spa-like feel to your home, you may even rethink your desire to move when the housing economy turns around.

Here are some tips to changing the bathroom of your home into a beautiful and comfortable space:

* Vanity: Used for hand washing, preening in the mirror and brushing teeth, the vanity is one item in the bathroom that is the center of activity. Add an artistic – and economical – touch to your vanity with TOTO’s Wyeth Faucet, characterized by its refined good looks. When on, this budget-friendly, universal design faucet runs a mere 1.5 gallons of water per minute, earning it the green WaterSense label. In addition to the faucet, consider upgrading your mirror with a model that combines beauty and elegance in the room.

* Walls: A fresh coat of paint can go a long way in changing the look and feel of a room. Don’t forget about the ceiling. Even if you only give it a new white coat, the fresh look can make all the difference. Choose a paint that handles high humidity well to give your upgrade a longer lifespan.

* Toilet: The toilet tends to be the largest water consumption appliance in homes. But replacing your older toilet with TOTO’s 1G, a one-gallon per flush ultra high-efficiency toilet, can really affect your utility bills. This gravity-fed toilet uses Double Cyclone Flushing technology to provide excellent performance and exceptional bowl cleansing action to create a green, clean flushing system that saves you money, water and time cleaning the toilet, always a thankless task.

As you upgrade your toilet, don’t stop with just installing a high-efficiency, self-cleansing toilet. Bring the spa to your own home and consider upgrading your toilet with TOTO’s Washlet S350e or S300e, which turns a toilet into a warm-water personal cleansing unit. These new additions to the Washlet family use eWater+ technology, which is applied after each flush and once every eight hours when the unit is not in use, disinfect the bowl, reducing the need for harsh chemicals during cleaning, which saves money and is better for the environment.

* Flooring: High humidity often found in bathrooms can quickly age the flooring, causing peeling and even cracking of dated linoleum. Plus, modern flooring products are much higher quality, and are built to withstand more traffic and high humidity environments. Consider using ceramic, clay or stone tiles, or laminate in stone or wood styles to modernize the look of your bathroom.

Upgrading a bathroom will transform your entire house with a new look and feel. And if you love the change enough, you might decide to continue the upgrade to another room, like the kitchen or master bedroom, turning your home into the beautiful house of your dreams.

Can The Internet Be Your Agent?

Can The Internet Be Your Agent?

The number of consumers that go online each year to research at least a portion of a new home search is steadily growing year after year. As the internet gains an even bigger foothold in the United States, its use is likely to steadily grow and accomplish much of that growth in unexpected areas. One of those areas has been the selling of property online.

For some home sellers, selling a home online merges the excitement of the internet with the ability to control the marketing of the property from start to finish. To be clear, having a real estate agent or at the very least a real estate lawyer throughout any selling process will most certainly help you as move along the course of action. Particular if you are on your first home sale, a real estate agent can offer invaluable advice and handle your transaction in a professional manner.

That being said, many sellers will still look at an internet sale as a great way to personally market the property and save a bit on real estate fees in the long run. Are you really ready to sell your property online though? There are some questions you need to ask yourself before you pursue an internet sale.

Am I Comfortable With Online-Only Advertising?

The best way to get a person online and looking at the materials on your property is to catch them while they’re online already. Of course, online advertising is the best way to do so. Some sellers are uncomfortable pursuing only web-based advertising sources and would rather maintain a local perspective through newspaper listings. Figure out which consumer you are before embarking on an internet sale.

Will The Home Show Well Online?

If you are committed to an online-only sale, you will need sparkling pictures of your property in order to convince a buyer to pursue an online real estate transaction with your property. For most people that put their homes for sale online, professional photos serve this purpose well.

A professional photographer will know how to showcase your property and get the most out of the shots taken. These photos will take the place of an initial showing for many online buyers, so ensuring that they make a great first impression is critical to the online selling process.

Can I Transition From The Internet To Personal Contact Efficiently?

Just as a newspaper ad or other marketing material, the internet is merely a tool to help you sell your property, not a replacement real estate agent. The internet will not negotiate for you or find you a title company automatically. It will also not be the only way you deal with a potential buyer and indeed very quickly a potential buyer will want to talk to you to put a voice with the home instead of a web address.

For most sellers, the internet can be a great tool for the selling of a home, but probably not the entire process. With local regulations to be considered and a negotiation process to endure (possibly with a buyer’s agent on the other end), a real estate expert of some kind like a real estate agent or real estate lawyer will still need to be involved in the transaction.

However, if you feel that selling your home on the internet is an exciting prospect and doing so will motivate you better to put time and effort into the sale, it can be a great option. As long as you remember that it is ultimately a mechanism to put you in personal contact with a potential buyer and not the end-all solution to your real estate sale, you can create a positive, efficient, fun internet selling process for your property.

This is another original article by Joe Lane, co-owner of The Lane Real Estate Team at http://www.joelane.com/. Are you looking for an experienced Tri City WA Real Estate agency? With 20 years of service based, business experience, Joe and Colleen Lane work hard to serve home buyers and sellers for the Tri Cities of Washington’s Kennewick, Richland, Pasco, and surrounding areas.

Buying a home: Prepare by getting your finances in order

(ARA) – For those considering buying a home, the current real estate market presents some unique opportunities. One of the side effects of the economic roller coaster ride of the past few years is that home prices have gone down and more homes have gone on the market. For buyers, that means more choices and better deals.  However, those same tumultuous years also can also teach buyers a lesson: Make smart buying decisions and be wise with your finances.

Impulsive buying is never a good idea when it comes to a purchase as significant as a home, but it was something of a trend at the height of the mid-2000s. Now, with banks lending far more cautiously, you need to be absolutely certain that your finances are in order – and healthy – to be able to get the best deal on your purchase.

There are a number of steps you can take to get ready to buy a home, and you might need to work on them simultaneously. Consider that you’ll need to start saving, if you haven’t already, but you’ll also need to review your credit score and do what you can to either maintain it or work toward healthier credit. Both of these tasks will help make the home-buying process better for you.

Your credit is an important factor in determining the terms under which you can get a mortgage. Broadly speaking, the better your credit is, the more positively you’ll be viewed by lenders – and that can lead to better interest rates. And because you’ll be paying off your home for years to come, it’s important to get the best rate possible.

Start by checking your credit report. You’re entitled to one free check of your report, from TransUnion and other credit reporting agencies every year.  As much as you need to check your report to find out what shape your credit is in, it’s also essential to review it for inaccuracies or fraudulent activity, both of which can have a negative impact on your score.

If your credit health needs some work, start taking action immediately. Paying bills on time, reducing your overall debt and limiting new credit inquiries can all help to build your credit – but be patient as it can take time for your positive actions to take effect. Nevertheless, the sooner you make the effort, the sooner you’ll see results.

Making a prudent decision about buying a house comes down to an honest assessment of what you can afford. Keep in mind that you might be approved for a loan that’s larger than what is practical for you to afford. While it may be tempting to buy a pricier house, the stress of struggling to make payments could diminish your enjoyment of your new home and even put you at financial risk. One rule of thumb is that most borrowers can afford a home loan that runs about two and a half times their annual salary.

Buying a home is a complex process, but one that is ultimately very rewarding when done right. By organizing your finances well in advance, you’ll help set yourself up for success. For more information about credit and buying a home, visit www.transunion.com.

Rent or Own? The Pros of Each

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By : Andy Asbury    99 or more times read
For some people, owning a home is an integral part of achieving the American Dream. But for others, and perhaps a growing number of people, home ownership is not in the cards. And oftentimes, that is a calculated choice people make. The reality today is that some people simply prefer to rent a home instead of own one. Of course, there are upsides to both renting and owning.

Owning a home: Pros
The home is yours. Want to change the paint color? Go ahead. Refinish the floors? You can do that, too. Build equity as you make monthly mortgage payments? Check. People who own their condo, loft or single-family home have flexibility to make the changes they want, provided they are not outside the bounds of city ordinances (in the case of single-family homes) or association co-op rules (in the case of condos and lofts).

And in some markets, including Minneapolis, owning a home actually makes more economic sense. According to a recent Wall Street Journal survey (based on data from Zillow, Inc.), 12 of 27 metro areas favor owning a home rather than renting one. In Minneapolis, for example, the average monthly mortgage payment for homeowners is $776, compared to the average monthly rent payment of $953.

Homeowners also enjoy a sense of security. They are not subject to landlords who do not want to extend a lease, or who are not prompt in dealing with issues that arise. Additionally, homeowners essentially invest in themselves each time they make a mortgage payment or complete a home-improvement project.

Renting a home: Pros
You are not the owner. That means your landlord, not you, likely is responsible for major repairs. Furnace goes out? Call the landlord. Ditto if, for example, the roof develops a leak. For that reason, people who rent can take comfort in knowing exactly how much of their money goes into their home each month or year.

Renters also enjoy flexibility. Since leases generally last for fixed periods of time, renters can live in one spot for a year or two, and then try somewhere else. Or maybe you have a job that keeps you on the move. In that case, renting is a good choice because you are not on the hook for selling a home before you can move.

Renting also tends to be less labor-intensive than owning. Renters often can decorate a home to line up with their personal tastes, but they generally do not need to worry about things like landscaping, mowing the grass in the summer, or removing snow in the winter. As a result, renters have more time for the activities they enjoy.

Author and Broker, Andy Asbury, studies Minneapolis condos, closely. His team of Urban Agents at Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Area Leaders are focused on the latest trends in buildings like the Carlyle in downtown.

7 External Areas To Check When You Are Viewing a House

  
By : James Hardy    99 or more times read

When viewing a house, many people concentrate on aspects such as room sizes and interior features, and entirely forget to check the external areas. Ideally, you should view the inside and outside of a house to fully gage its suitability. Here are a few pointers to use when assessing the exterior of a house.

    1. What is the street like? You may absolutely love the house you are viewing, but take a look at neighbouring properties. After all, if you are surrounded by run down, unkempt properties, this will hardly be an ideal situation, and could affect you if you decide to sell the house in the future.
    1. Parking – if you drive, this is an especially important aspect to consider, is there a garage attached to the house, or sufficient space to park on the drive? Do you need more than one parking space? Is the house on a main road, and if so, what are the rules about parking?
    1. Roofs and guttering – It’s amazing, but many people don’t notice the roof when they are viewing a house. Take a good look – does the roof look in decent condition? are there any slates or tiles missing? Is the guttering in good condition, or filled with weeds and overflowing? Also check for tell tale signs of mould on the exterior walls i.e. streaks running down the walls, this could suggest leaks or poor maintenance. Also check flat roofs (on extensions etc), are they showing signs of wear and tear?
    1. Walls – Have a good look at the exterior walls. What state is the brickwork or rendering in? is the paintwork OK? Check for any cracks – they can be a sign of subsidence, and try to spot any areas of neglect. Check the same points for extensions or conservatories.
    1. Windows – Check to see if the house is double glazed, and that the window seals are in good condition. If made of timber – check that the wood is free from woodworm, mould or decay. Security-wise, do the windows have locks?
    1. Garden – Walk around the garden, and ask yourself, how big is it? Which direction does it face, which features will be included in the house sale? Is it what you’re looking for maintenance wise?
    1. Shared areas – This is particularly applicable if you are viewing a shared house or flat/apartment. Find out which areas are shared with the neighbours e.g. the garden, walk ways and parking. Also check the boundaries between properties – this can be a major source of conflict between neighbours.
Before viewing a property you might want to visit this website: Buy my house quickly.

Rent or Own? The Pros of Each

By : Andy Asbury    99 or more times read

For some people, owning a home is an integral part of achieving the American Dream. But for others, and perhaps a growing number of people, home ownership is not in the cards. And oftentimes, that is a calculated choice people make. The reality today is that some people simply prefer to rent a home instead of own one. Of course, there are upsides to both renting and owning.

Owning a home: Pros

The home is yours. Want to change the paint color? Go ahead. Refinish the floors? You can do that, too. Build equity as you make monthly mortgage payments? Check. People who own their condo, loft or single-family home have flexibility to make the changes they want, provided they are not outside the bounds of city ordinances (in the case of single-family homes) or association co-op rules (in the case of condos and lofts).

And in some markets, including Minneapolis, owning a home actually makes more economic sense. According to a recent Wall Street Journal survey (based on data from Zillow, Inc.), 12 of 27 metro areas favor owning a home rather than renting one. In Minneapolis, for example, the average monthly mortgage payment for homeowners is $776, compared to the average monthly rent payment of $953.

Homeowners also enjoy a sense of security. They are not subject to landlords who do not want to extend a lease, or who are not prompt in dealing with issues that arise. Additionally, homeowners essentially invest in themselves each time they make a mortgage payment or complete a home-improvement project.

Renting a home: Pros

You are not the owner. That means your landlord, not you, likely is responsible for major repairs. Furnace goes out? Call the landlord. Ditto if, for example, the roof develops a leak. For that reason, people who rent can take comfort in knowing exactly how much of their money goes into their home each month or year.

Renters also enjoy flexibility. Since leases generally last for fixed periods of time, renters can live in one spot for a year or two, and then try somewhere else. Or maybe you have a job that keeps you on the move. In that case, renting is a good choice because you are not on the hook for selling a home before you can move.

Renting also tends to be less labor-intensive than owning. Renters often can decorate a home to line up with their personal tastes, but they generally do not need to worry about things like landscaping, mowing the grass in the summer, or removing snow in the winter. As a result, renters have more time for the activities they enjoy.

Author and Broker, Andy Asbury, studies Minneapolis condos, closely. His team of Urban Agents at Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Area Leaders are focused on the latest trends in buildings like the Carlyle in downtown.